At-Home Self-Care Part 3: 3 Low Back Exercises to Stabilize Your Spine

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While some lower back pain can occur as a result of injury, some pain is simply a result of a sedentary lifestyle that leads to weakness of muscles surrounding the spine and supporting the body. When at-home stretching and strengthening exercises are paired with spinal manipulation therapy, patients can experience further relief from pain and strengthening and prevent in the long term.
In part three of our spinal self-care series, we’re going to share three helpful exercises that allow you to improve your range of motion, reduce pain, and stabilize your spine. After an injury and initial adjustment, it’s important to slowly build up your injured muscles to protect your spine prior to trying more difficult strengthening exercises. By building a foundation, you’re creating the support your spine needs to begin strengthening and continue to be aligned.
Here’s Dr. Delaney McMann of our Bedford Clinic to talk through these three exercises:

1. Belly Breathing

Deep, purposeful belly breathing may not sound like the exercise you’d expect to use for strengthening, but it’s a key step toward building a core that can support your spine properly. During a deep belly breath, your diaphragm is expanded with the help of your abdominal muscles. The longer and deeper your breathing becomes, the harder your abdominal muscles will be working and strengthening.
For this exercise, lay flat on your back with one hand on your chest and one hand on your belly. Make sure as you breathe in that your chest does not rise fully. Only breathe into your belly. The goal is to work up to a 12 second inhale, but starting small is always best. Repeat 5 times per day.

2. Pelvic Tilt

While laying on your back, bend your knees and place your feet comfortably on the ground. Making sure your low back remains on the floor, and tilt your pelvis up and in. You should feel the contraction of your muscles in your lower back. Hold for a belly breath, then relax.
Next, flatten your back, pushing it down towards the floor to close the space between your spine and the ground. You should feel the tightening in your abdominal muscles. Hold for 5 seconds, then relax. Repeat this exercise 20 times in the morning and 20 times in the evening.
You can also take this move on an exercise ball. With your legs at a right angle and your feet planted firmly on the ground. Use only your pelvis, keeping your knees still, to tilt forward and backward. You can also try to move your pelvis in a circular motion for added strengthening in your side abdomen.

3. Side Plank

While side planks can be challenging because it requires both strength and balance, working on these two elements combined is a great way to stabilize your muscles. Lay on your side with your lower forearm on the ground and your feet stacked together. Position your elbow directly below the shoulder to keep your body aligned properly.
From here, press into your bottom forearm and lift your pelvis off the ground, keeping your feet together. If you need more stability, try separating your feet or leaving your knees on the ground. Belly breathe while you hold your plank for 30 seconds.
Make sure you repeat this exercise on both sides for even strengthening. Though our muscles aren’t typically symmetrical in strength, it’s a good goal to work towards. Do this exercise 2-3 times daily.
Practicing these exercises daily will help to stabilize your muscles so that you can take on more complex strengthening exercises later in your treatment. These exercises will reduce the likelihood of re-injuring yourself and help you find further relief from lower back pain!
If you’re ready to take control of your spinal self-care, the doctors at Tuck Chiropractic would love to help you on your journey! Schedule an appointment today.
Stay tuned for the final installment of our spinal self-care series where we explore more complex strengthening exercises for your back!
 

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At-Home Self-Care Part 2: 5 Stretches to Loosen Lower Back Tension

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We’re continuing our spinal self-care series by talking about what to do after your first few adjustments! Stretching out tight muscles surrounding the spine is key to recovery and healing after an injury.

Inflammation often causes tightness in the muscles surrounding our spine. It’s your body’s way of attempting to protect itself from movements that could cause further damage. Without stretching, the body will tighten up more and more over time and will slow down the healing process. Here are six stretches you can do anywhere to loosen your muscles. The first three focus on your lumbar spine while the second set focuses on your sacrum.

1. Knee-to-Chest

While laying on your back, grab each leg behind the knee and pull them towards your chest. If you have difficulty reaching your legs, you can put a towel behind your knees to use to pull upward. This stretch can also be done one leg at a time. Hold for thirty seconds at a time.

You should feel this stretch in your lower back and glutes. If this stretch causes back pain to move into your legs or if you have existing sciatica pain, ask your doctor for an alternative.

2.  Seated Flexion

While sitting comfortable on a chair with your feet flat on the ground, lean forward so that your torso hangs between your legs. Allow your body to relax and let gravity pull you into a gentle stretch. Do not strain your back to force yourself forward and downward by pulling on your legs or chair. You should feel this stretch in your lower back and glutes. Hold for thirty seconds at a time.

3. Hamstring Stretch

While standing, place your heel on an elevated service at approximately knee height. Maintain a neutral or straight spine, avoiding arching your lower back. Bending at the hip, til your torso forward.

You can also take this stretch laying down on your back at a doorway or wall. Lift your leg up and rest the heel on the doorway or wall. You should feel this stretch in the back of your thigh and possibly behind your knee. Hold for 30 seconds on each leg.

4.Figure Four Stretch

While sitting in a chair, cross the ankle of the affected side to your opposite knee, creating a figure four. Lean forward slightly while keeping your back straight, bend at the hips rather than rounding your back.

You can also take this stretch on your back. After crossing the affected ankle over the opposite knee, grab the knee and pull it towards your chest. Hold gently for 30 seconds. You should feel this stretch in your gluteal region.

5. Hip Flexor Stretch

Stand in a split-stance or lung position with one foot placed on the ground behind you. Bend your front knee slightly until you feel a stretch in the back leg.

You can also take this stretch on your back on the edge of a bed. Allow your leg to hang off the side. Use your hands to pull the opposite leg towards your chest. You should feel this stretch in the front of your thigh and in the groin area.

As with any stretch or exercise, it’s important to not over exert yourself or you could injure yourself further. If you have trouble doing any of these stretches, talk with your chiropractor about alternatives. When paired with spinal manipulation therapy, icing, and strengthening exercises, these stretches can help you find relief for your lower back pain.

If you’re ready to take control of your spinal self-care, the doctors at Tuck Chiropractic would love to help you on your journey! Schedule an appointment today.

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5 Habits for Spinal Self Care

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As a chiropractic clinic, we believe in the power of keeping your spine healthy. With thousands of nerves connecting to your spinal cord and from your tail bone all the way to your brain, your back and spine are massive components in your nervous system, which transmits signals between your brain and different parts of the body.

Needless to say, if your spine isn’t in proper alignment, it can cause problems such as:

  • headaches
  • pain in lower back, neck, knees or hips
  • excessive fatigue
  • numbness or tingling in the hands or feet

If you feel like you’re experiencing these types of problems, it’s probably time for you to call a chiropractor. But if you’re in between visits or simply want to form good habits for a healthy spine, here are five habits that can help your spine feel great:

Stretch Out

One of the best ways to keep your spine healthy is to stretch every day. Simple stretching for 2 minutes a day can do wonders for your back and your whole body. Here are some simple ones to try, holding each pose for about 10 seconds.

  • Toe Touch – Bend forward and touch your toes (or as far down as you reasonably can reach)
  • Standing Quad Stretch – Stand straight and tall and pull your right foot up behind you and hold. Feel the stretch through the front of your leg. Switch.
  • Seated Twist – Sit on the floor with your legs extended straight in front of you. Bend your right knee, and reach over with your left arm to hug it. You can even place your left elbow on the outside of your right leg. Feel the stretch in your right glute and your back. Hold for 10 seconds and switch.

For more stretching ideas, check out this 10-minute daily stretching sequence from FitBit.

Exercise Often

If you sit in an office chair all day and then go home and sit on the couch to watch TV, you might notice your back feeling tight. Interestingly, rest isn’t always good for your back, and too much inactivity can cause muscle weakness that leads to strained muscles and pain. If your back is in good shape, exercise can help keep your back muscles limber and flexible. Look for exercises that engage your core. Strengthening your back and abdominal muscles will help keep your spine healthy and strong.

Sit and Stand Tall

Having improper posture can make it hard for your spine to stay in proper alignment because it increases the stress on the ligaments holding the joints of your spine together. Unfortunately, many of us have never had great posture, so our muscles aren’t accustomed to holding up our torsos correctly.

At your desk, sit all the way back in your chair and put a small cushion or even a rolled-up towel behind your lower-mid back. This is to support the natural bend in your spine. Make sure your knees are level with your hips or even a bit higher. Your feet should be able to rest flat on the floor. Make sure your arm rests are at the appropriate height so your shoulders stay low at the proper position.

When standing, keep your back straight as if someone was pulling your hair or you were balancing a bottle on your head. Tuck in your chin, and keep your shoulders back. Keep your hips directly below your torso. Over time, you should begin to notice a difference in your posture. Your spine will thank you!

Sleep Straight

We should all spend about 8 hours asleep every night, but if you’re sleeping in an unhealthy position for your spine, that means that you’re risking improper alignment for a third of each day.

If you sleep on your stomach, your spine is misaligned from your neck down. Try to sleep on your back, maybe with a pillow placed under your knees. The next best option is to sleep on your side; you can place the pillow between your knees.

Calm Down

If you’re experiencing back pain alongside anxiety, there may be good reason for that. Similar to poor posture, anxiety often causes your muscles to tense. Maybe you notice you’re holding your shoulders too high; alongside back pain, this type of physical stress can cause tension headaches.

Instead of allowing your anxiety to affect your back, treat the root issue. Practice simple breathing exercises like 4-7-8. Inhale for a count of 4 through your nose; hold it in for a count of 7; and exhale for a count of 8 through your mouth.

Keep your spine healthy and strong by practicing these five steps. If you want to jumpstart your results, see a chiropractor at Tuck Clinic for relief from back pain. You might not get it right away, but by building healthy habits, your spine is sure to thank you for it.

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At-Home Self-Care Part 1: 3 Ways to Control Inflammation

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Pain may sometimes feel like a difficult thing to overcome, but when you have the right resources to support you, the outcomes speak for themselves. We’re kicking off our spinal self-care series to empower our patients to take their treatments a step further at home. We can help you in the clinic, but at the end of the day, it’s up to you to create habits that help you heal. Let’s begin with exploring how to control inflammation.

When it comes to identifying the source of pain at its core, it’s often a result of inflammation. Inflammation is your body’s response to damaged cells, irritation and strain, and pathogens. When activated in the body tissues,  muscles and joints can experience swelling. Chronic inflammation can also result in wearing down of cartilage between your bones, causing long-term chronic pain.

One of the most important steps to reducing pain is controlling inflammation. Let’s talk about the three steps you can reduce pain at home.

1. Choose Ice Over Heat

While a heating pad may be the first thing you reach for when you experience pain because of the temporary relief it brings, heat can actually worsen your inflammation because it increases blood flow to the area. If you do choose to heat your back, you should always follow up with ice to dull the pain and reduce swelling.

When applying ice to an injured lower back, make sure the ice pack is wrapped in a thin towel to avoid direct skin contact. Apply ice for 20 minutes and take a 40 minute break before reapplying to avoid damaging your skin and keep the ice pack cool enough to be effective. Ice is most effective in the first 72 hours after an injury, but can also provide relief of soreness after a treatment or physical activity.

2. Modify your Activity Levels

It’s likely you know what strains your back and what doesn’t. Whenever possible, avoid or modify activities that are known to increase your pain. Try not to spend too much time sitting or standing and avoid lifting. If you’re unsure about what to avoid, your chiropractor can give you tips.

Bedrest can be tempting when you’re experiencing chronic pain, but laying around can lead to improper positioning of your  back. While it may provide temporary relief, avoiding movement can continue to weaken your back and lead to an extended healing process.

3. Consider Active Rest

Active rest” may sound like a confusing concept, but balancing your rest with light activity is the key to recovery. Consider limiting high impact movements and exercises that could worsen your injury. Rest is important, but some maintaining some amount of exercise is necessary to help things return to normal.

Low impact aerobic exercises and stretching are great ways to release pain-killing endorphins and pump nutrients into injured tissues. Low impact exercises include swimming, using an elliptical or stationery bike, or walking. If you find that your back is still feeling strained after these activities, try to find something new.

We’ll talk more about therapeutic stretches and exercises that can help you strengthen your muscles on your own time later in this at-home self-care series. These methods, paired with regular chiropractic adjustments can have you well on your way to healing and living a better life.

If you’re ready to take control of your spinal self-care, the doctors at Tuck Chiropractic would love to help you on your journey! Schedule an appointment today.

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How to Avoid Injury When Reviving your Workout Routine

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New Year, New You, Right?

It’s a common refrain every January. “This year,” many say, “I’m going to be more physically active.” In fact, according to a survey conducted by NPR and the Marist Poll, 13% of adults who made a New Year’s resolution resolved to work out more, making it the most common resolution.

And truthfully, it’s a great goal to shoot for. Increasing your physical fitness is one of the easiest and best ways to boost your overall health, especially for your heart and muscles.

However, many people sabotage themselves by working out too hard or too long when they’re just starting out. Overexerting your muscles and joints can lead to injury, especially in the early stages of a workout routine when your body isn’t used to the activity.

This year, keep up your workout routine by preventing injuries through these 5 simple steps:

Discuss your resolution with your doctor

As much as you’d like to not admit it, you’re probably not as nimble as you used to be. As we age even into our 20s and 30s, it’s common for our muscles and joints to be sore after a sudden increase in physical activity. For some people, that soreness is natural. For others, especially women over 55 years old and men over 45 years old, it’s a good idea to discuss your new workout routine with your doctor. Your doctor can rule out any eventual problems so you can move confidently toward a more active future.

Be reasonable

It can be tempting to overreach and imagine yourself transforming back into the star athlete you were in high school. But after not working out for a long time, it can be dangerous to expect too much from your body too quickly. Instead, opt for a workout routine that makes sense for you. If your knee tends to hurt, choose a low-impact option that keeps your knees healthy but strong.

Limber up

You might remember stretching before gym class. Turns out, that’s not just to fill up the class period. It’s good to stretch your muscles before exerting them because cold and tight muscles are more likely to get injured. However, how we grew up stretching (holding one position for 10-15 seconds) isn’t considered the best for your muscles. Now fitness experts recommend doing dynamic stretches where you stretch your muscles through movement.

In the same way, it’s smart to gently stretch and cool down your muscles after working out. This keeps your tired muscles from tightening up and can help reduce soreness.

Variety is the spice of life

Exerting the same muscles in a workout day after day can cause undue strain on particular muscles and joints while leaving others relatively untouched. If you tend to workout your arms everyday, instead add in core and leg exercises to keep your whole body strong. Or get out of the gym entirely and go for a hike or a bike ride. Doing various types of physical activity helps prevent overuse injury and keeps you from getting bored with the same workout routine.

Know your body

We all know that working out isn’t a pain-free experience. Your muscles ache when you’re pushing yourself, and in many cases, you should push yourself through a reasonable amount of discomfort. As they say, “No pain, no gain.”

However, know your body well enough to know when you should stop or take a break. Sure, exercise can cause pain, but be sure that you’re not injuring yourself by pushing yourself too much.

Live Stronger

If you’re beginning a new workout routine and are experiencing joint or back pain, the chiropractors at Tuck Clinic can help you determine the problem and keep your spine in alignment so you can safely pursue your dreams of a more active lifestyle. Let the experts at Tuck help you feel better so you can live stronger.

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Patient Success Story: Phil Rice Tackles the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route

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“Well, the first thing I’m going to do is go see my chiropractor,” is the first thing Phil Rice said after biking 2,745 miles along the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route.

Phil Rice is an avid cyclist, cross fitter, and patient at Tuck Chiropractic in Roanoke. As an active person at the age of 56, Rice recognizes the important role chiropractic has played in his health and endurance. Prior to seeing Dr. Skinner at our Peters Creek Road clinic, he was a consistent chiropractic patient in Richmond for 5 years. After relocating to Roanoke, he heard that our practice was highly recommended, and the rest is history!

“I heard Dr. Skinner had a great understanding of caring for athletes,” says Rice.

When he first visited the clinic, Rice experienced tightness in his neck and shoulders and some lower back pain as a result of tightness in his hip flexors. His sedentary job combined with the strain that crossfit can put on your body had been causing this pain. Within two weeks he saw a significant difference in his discomfort and increase mobility.

“We know that a sedentary lifestyle can lead to back pain,” says Skinner. “Sitting and driving all week, and then going into crossfit-style work outs can cause issues. He’s in great shape to begin with so he responded very well to treatment.”

Preparing for the Grand Depart

In Spring of 2019, Rice shared with Dr. Skinner that he had set the goal to complete the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route, traveling from Banff, Alberta, Canada to the United States/Mexico Border by mountain bike. It was a bucket list trip and Dr. Skinner was eager to help him prepare with a maintenance program.

“As the training volume increased, we essentially just wanted to keep Phil out of pain,” says Skinner. “We continued the same type of care by keeping his muscles stretched out and his joints mobile.”

Both Rice and Skinner attribute the successful treatment experience to Dr. Skinner’s own experience as an athlete, paired with his expertise in patient-centered chiropractic care. His full understanding of the human body and how it reacts to stressors from certain workouts enabled him to pin point the issues and provide non-invasive treatments at the source of the pain. Through open communication about what kind of strain Rice had been experiencing from workouts week to week, Skinner was able to adjust treatments accordingly.

“It also helped me on my training journey while I was doing crossfit and cycling because Dr. Skinner was able to keep me in line and adjusting my own workouts until an injury was worked through,” says Rice. “His understanding of what I was doing provided me with significant peace of mind.”

Rice completed the entire 2,745 miles along the Great Divide Mountain Bike Route in 38 days with no pain or injury, thanks to his preparation and treatment with Tuck Chiropractic.

“It’s rewarding to hear that. We work hard at trying to make people feel better and when they come in and tell us those kinds of thing, it puts a little extra pep in our step,” says Skinner.

Rice feels like he has a true partner in his health and personal fitness goals and plan to continue striking off his bucket list and seeing Dr. Skinner. He participates in cycling events to raise money for research on illnesses like multiple sclerosis, cystic fibrosis, and cancer.

If you have a goal to maintain an active lifestyle or simply want to find relief from pain, we’re here to help. Find a clinic convenient to you or call 540-951-6900 to feel better and live better today!

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Five Ways to Help your Body Recover from Stress this Holiday Season

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With the holiday season well under way, you probably feel like you couldn’t squeeze one more thing into your day. The truth is, we’re all running at max capacity, and our bodies are suffering for it.

Stress can cause many problems throughout our bodies including our cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Plus, that muscle tension you’re feeling in your shoulders and neck are usually a result of stress.

What You Can Do to Alleviate Stress

No one wants to feel stressed, but sometimes we find ourselves stressed out, anyways. It’s important to break the cycle of stress before our bodies suffer.

“You don’t want to wait until your body starts breaking down from the stress,” says Dr. Anna Flynn, chiropractor at our Botetourt office. “When your body starts to break down, you end up in a ‘healthcare crisis,’ which is absolutely the worst time to start prioritizing your health.”

So DREAM of a healthier mind and body with these tips:

D: Diet. Try whole foods, fresh fruits and vegetables, good clean water. Also be sure you’re not adding chemical stress to your life by consuming things that your body has a hard time processing, whether that be dairy, gluten, or other food sensitivities.

R: Rest. We need between 7-9 hours of sleep each time, but most people aren’t getting that. The truth is that if you’re not sleeping, you’re not allowing your body to recover from the stress of each day.

E: Exercise. Exercise is a huge stress reliever. We should aim for three to five 20-30 minute workouts every week. It doesn’t have to be intense either! Even walking counts. If you’re short on time, HIT (High-Intensity Interval) training is a great exercise that gets right to the point.

A: Alignment and posture. Posture is something that falls by the wayside in many people’s minds, but it’s so important. Most Americans have anterior head carriage from working on a computer or looking at a phone. Make sure that you stand tall with your shoulders back. The center of your ears should line up with your shoulders, which should line up with your hips to the knees to the outside of the ankles. Chiropractors are experts in alignment and posture, so make sure to see a chiropractor if you want to work on how you sit and stand.

M: Mindfulness. Oftentimes stress starts in your mind. If your mind is racing from all of the things you have to do, your body will suffer from stress. Slow your mind down through a simple breathing exercise. Think about the sequence 4-7-8. Inhale for a count of 4 through your nose; hold it in for a count of 7; and exhale for a count of 8 through your mouth. This simple breathing exercise will help you when you’re feeling stressed and can also lower your blood pressure and heart rate, reversing some of the physical signs of stress.

Feel Better

Start feeling better by giving these techniques a try. If you want to jumpstart your results, see a chiropractor at Tuck Clinic for relief from some of these physical effects of stress. And don’t worry if it takes a few weeks to see results in your stress levels. Over time, your body will thank you for it.

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Patient Testimonial: Shannon and Jessica Zimmerman

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A Healthy Spine for an Active Life

“We lead busy lifestyles, and we’re always on the go,” said Jessica Zimmerman, patient at Tuck Clinic at our Bedford office.

A respiratory therapist with Carilion, Jessica stays busy with her work and family and depends on Tuck Clinic to keep her body on the right track.

“I’m on my feet 12+ hours at work, and as I’m getting older, I feel my body ache more,” said Jessica. “It helps to know I can go to the chiropractor and start feeling better.”

Jessica started going to Dr. A.J. LaBarbera about fifteen years ago when she was pregnant with her son who is now fourteen years old. “I was having back pain and sciatic nerve problems from pregnancy, and some coworkers recommended that I try out chiropractic.”

It didn’t take long for Jessica to be convinced of how chiropractic could relieve her pain. “After one adjustment, I immediately felt relief,” explained Jessica. “The problem wasn’t solved immediately, but I felt a lot better right away. It was amazing to me.”

A Family Affair

Tuck Clinic has been a part of Jessica’s life ever since. In fact, Jessica’s husband, Shannon, started seeing Dr. LaBarbera soon after Jessica felt relief from her back pain. Like Jessica, Shannon’s job as lieutenant with the Bedford County Sheriff’s Office demands a lot from his back. “I carry a lot of equipment around my waist everyday on the job,” said Shannon. “If you count the belt and the vest I wear, it’s about 30 pounds of added weight along my torso and hips.”

After years as a police officer, Shannon began noticing the strain that he was putting on his spine. “When I sit in a car with that weight around my waist, it can start to cause a strain on my lower back,” said Shannon. “And sometimes I have to hop out of the car at a moment’s notice. That agility and flexibility can be hard when your back isn’t in good shape.”

Now that Shannon has gotten his back in better shape with chiropractic, it’s fairly simple to keep from being in pain. “I can have a kink in my back, and go see Dr. LaBarbera for an adjustment,” said Shannon. “By the next day, I’ve already got relief.”

Why Tuck?

“I went to other chiropractors before, and I didn’t feel like I got any relief,” said Shannon. “Dr. A.J. and the chiropractors at Tuck Clinic are just so hands on and get things moving better than other chiropractors.”

Jessica loves the friendship that she has with the Tuck team. “The staff are amazing and willing to help,” she said. “If you’re in pain, you can go by at anytime, and they’ll always try to work you in.”

“Dr. A.J. has a sincere desire to help people,” Jessica continued. “He really cares about his patients and about how they feel. He’s consistent about keeping up with our back and neck issues, and that relationship is what keeps us coming back to Tuck year after year.”

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The Serious Effects of Stress on our Bodies

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As we become ever more connected through technology, zipping around in cars and tapping away at our phones, we’ve become busier and busier. “Society as a whole is completely stressed out,” says Dr. Anna Flynn. “We have a schedule that prescribes what we do from the moment we wake up to the moment we go to bed.”

And oftentimes we bear this stress day in and day out, and except for a week-long vacation at the beach once a year, never take time to recuperate and recover from that daily stress.

As Dr. Flynn explains, there are three kinds of stress that manifest themselves in our minds and bodies.

Physical Stress

Physical stress is related to your body. If you sit at a desk, drive, or stand all day, or do a job that requires you to lift heavy items, your body is under physical stress. Any of these activities can put a strain on your neck, lower, and upper back.

Chemical Stress

Chemical stressors are the things in the environment like harmful fragrances or unclean air that we breathe in or things we consume, such as processed foods, artificial sweeteners, sugar, and alcohol in excess.

Emotional Stress

Even if you haven’t noticed the first two types of stress in your life, most people can relate to emotional stress. You experience this type of stress if you’re too busy running from one place to the next, especially common now in the holiday season, as well as from a toxic work or home environment.

A Never-ending Loop

“All three types of stress are equally bad, and they can all cause damage to our overall well-being,” says Dr. Flynn. “And our bodies cannot differentiate the differences between them and simply perceive all of them as stress.”

Stress is a normal physiological response designed to keep you safe in the event of a perceived danger. So when you have a perceived stress, a signal from your brain is sent to stimulate our stress hormone (like cortisol) to be released. When the hormones are released, it causes our heart rate and blood pressure to increase, readying us for the “perceived danger.”

“Where the disconnect is,” says Dr. Flynn, “is that so many people have multiple layers of stress in their lives that this loop never gets turned off. Eventually it starts to take a toll on your health.”

The Physical Signs of Stress

Ongoing stress like this can result in negative effects on different systems in your body:

  • Nervous system/muskuloskeletal: muscle tension, tightness in back/spine, neck stiffness, and back and neck pain
  • Cardiovascular: high blood pressure and abnormal heart rhythms
  • Gastrointestinal: such as GERD, gastritis, ulcerative colitis, and irritable colon
  • Mental health: depression, anxiety, and eating disorders
  • Skin and hair: acne, psoriasis, eczema, and permanent hair loss
  • Gastrointestinal: GERD, gastritis, ulcerative colitis, and irritable colon

“As chiropractors, we understand that all of these systems are connected with one another,” says Dr. Flynn. “And oftentimes it’s the neck and back pain that keeps us from engaging in healthy behaviors like sleeping well and exercising regularly.”

Chiropractic adjustments release muscle tension, realign your spine, and improve blood circulation, all things that help your brain turn off its stress response. Plus not having that nagging pain in your back can certainly help your body return to a more relaxed state.

If you’re experiencing some of these physical effects of stress, the chiropractors at Tuck Clinic can help you get back to feeling better so you can live better.

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Patient Testimonial: Linda Smith

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When Linda Smith found herself in debilitating pain from a back injury, she turned to Tuck Chiropractic for relief. Read how chiropractic has changed Linda’s life.

Seeking Treatment

When Linda Smith and her husband experienced back injuries, they weren’t sure what to do. “I had two falls, and both times, the pain was so bad,” said Linda. “I was all bent over and couldn’t walk. I could hardly put one foot in front of the other.”

Her husband, a firefighter, also had back problems and had heard of Tuck Clinic from his coworkers. “We were looking for somewhere to get treatment,” said Linda. “They recommended Dr. Rathmann at Tuck Clinic, and we’ve never seen anyone else since.”

“We were just immediately impressed with Jennifer,” said Linda.
“Tuck Clinic and Dr. Rathmann have the highest degree of professionalism of any doctors office I’ve ever seen.”

The Extra Mile

What really set Dr. Rathmann and Tuck Clinic apart from the rest was their willingness to go the extra mile.

“My husband injured his back and couldn’t move,” explained Linda. “When Jennifer realized that he had a ruptured disc, she called around to neurosurgeons in Roanoke and told them about his condition. She got an appointment for him later that day.”

“You feel so confident that she will take care of you, and if she can’t, she makes sure you get the help you need,” said Linda.

A Life with Chiropractic

Linda says that without Dr. Rathmann and Tuck Clinic in her and her husband’s lives, things may have turned out much differently. “I was dealing with back pain that was keeping me from sleeping,” said Linda. “After the first visit, I wasn’t healed, but I could actually sleep. And experiencing that kind of relief made such a big difference in my life.”

Reflecting back on her falls, Linda realized that without the help of Tuck Clinic, she very well may have ended up having surgery. But with chiropractic, Linda got treatment that was noninvasive and effective. “If I had to have surgery, that would have caused issues with my job. I didn’t have to go through any of that because of chiropractic care,” said Linda.

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